A Stab in the Heart of ’60s Liberalism: David Mamet Flips his World View

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Does it get any better than this? An icon of the smug, arrogant 1960s-molded New York literary set, legendary playwright David Mamet has chosen the ultimate venue, at the ultimate time in history, to flip on his fellow travelers, and join the real world. Published in yesterday’s Village Voice, New York’s iconic “alternative” newspaper (read: promoter of leftist orthodoxy and “arts” debauchery), Mamet’s piece is rocking the left-wing world. Read it all; you’ll scream with joy: Why I Am No Longer a ‘Brain-Dead Liberal’ – An election-season essay by David Mamet

As a child of the ’60s, I accepted as an article of faith that government is corrupt, that business is exploitative, and that people are generally good at heart.

These cherished precepts had, over the years, become ingrained as increasingly impracticable prejudices. Why do I say impracticable? Because although I still held these beliefs, I no longer applied them in my life. How do I know? My wife informed me. We were riding along and listening to NPR. I felt my facial muscles tightening, and the words beginning to form in my mind: Shut the fuck up. “?” she prompted. And her terse, elegant summation, as always, awakened me to a deeper truth: I had been listening to NPR and reading various organs of national opinion for years, wonder and rage contending for pride of place. Further: I found I had been—rather charmingly, I thought—referring to myself for years as “a brain-dead liberal,” and to NPR as “National Palestinian Radio.”

This is, to me, the synthesis of this worldview with which I now found myself disenchanted: that everything is always wrong.

But in my life, a brief review revealed, everything was not always wrong, and neither was nor is always wrong in the community in which I live, or in my country. Further, it was not always wrong in previous communities in which I lived, and among the various and mobile classes of which I was at various times a part.

And, I wondered, how could I have spent decades thinking that I thought everything was always wrong at the same time that I thought I thought that people were basically good at heart? Which was it? I began to question what I actually thought and found that I do not think that people are basically good at heart; indeed, that view of human nature has both prompted and informed my writing for the last 40 years. I think that people, in circumstances of stress, can behave like swine, and that this, indeed, is not only a fit subject, but the only subject, of drama.

I’d observed that lust, greed, envy, sloth, and their pals are giving the world a good run for its money, but that nonetheless, people in general seem to get from day to day; and that we in the United States get from day to day under rather wonderful and privileged circumstances—that we are not and never have been the villains that some of the world and some of our citizens make us out to be, but that we are a confection of normal (greedy, lustful, duplicitous, corrupt, inspired—in short, human) individuals living under a spectacularly effective compact called the Constitution, and lucky to get it.

h/t Small Dead Animals.

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1 Comment

Filed under Liberals Who Grew Up, The Confusion of The Left

One response to “A Stab in the Heart of ’60s Liberalism: David Mamet Flips his World View

  1. For a howl read some of the comments to that article.

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